Brigitte de Vet-Veithen

Brigitte is the head of Materialise Medical, a company focused on personalised solutions leveraging 3D printing technologies. She joined Materialise after more than 20 years of experience in Medical Devices with organisations such as Johnson & Johnson (where she had various management roles including VP EMEA of Neurovascular solutions), Acertys (as CEO) and Mediq (as Transformation Officer). She holds an MBA from INSEAD. She is passionate about driving change in Healthcare to make a difference to patients and healthcare systems. 

When it comes to people, one size does not fit all. It is no shock to hear that we all have different shapes and sizes. But then why do we turn to standard equipment and approaches for every patient in our hospitals today? Let’s take a step back and imagine a world where personalised treatments are the norm. The journey would start from the unique anatomy of each patient, applying artificial intelligence (AI) to simulate their surgery with precise details on a 3D model, letting the surgeon better anticipate any challenges. The optimal implant, along with the required instruments, is delivered right on time. Smart tools including guides, robots, and augmented reality assist the surgeon during procedure. The pre-surgical plan is shown on a screen or through glasses, allowing the doctor to make changes in real time and ensure impeccable execution. In this world, surgeries would be faster, right the first time around, and less wasteful. In essence, this world would be a more sustainable future with better patient outcomes. This aspirational world isn’t that far from today’s reality. Technologies such as AI are poised to transform the world of medicine. And the data to back AI in the OR is coming in: in one of our recent studies we found that surgeons need to make 50% fewer changes to AI-based pre-operative plans compared to current ones. With modern technology as an instrument in the "doctor’s bag", we will have the opportunity to personalise treatment and enhance more patients’ lives while driving process efficiencies and reducing cost of treatment. Getting It Right First Time Personalised approaches, such as the UK National Health Service’s Getting It Right First Time (GIRFT) initiative, in which, as the name implies, the focus is on ensuring patient care takes the best approach from the start...