Goran Ribaric

I trained as a surgeon & scientist and worked in clinical medicine and research at university & private hospitals for several years. I earned University Degree with professional doctorate in human medicine, M.D., postgraduate degree in biomedical sciences, M.Sc. and the research doctorate in clinical medical sciences, DSc./PhD., at the University of Zagreb, Croatia, as well as the postgraduate degree with certificate in Health Care Management, HCM at the Philips University of Marburg, Germany. 
 
I have over 25 years of experience in surgical practice, academia and medical device industry. Broad competence in surgical research, patient safety, Evidence-based Medicine, Health economics & Health Technology Assessment. Experienced in working with European governmental & scientific institutions such as NICE, UK and HAS, France, in fields of patient safety, clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of medical devices. 
 
Proven leader in health care business and research. Awarded with the Johnson & Johnson Gold Encore Award (2019), the Johnson & Johnson Leadership Award (2017), the Johnson & Johnson Gold Encore Award (2012) and the Johnson & Johnson Global Standards of Leadership Award (2007) in recognition for exceptional leadership behaviors and business results as well as with the University of Zagreb Rector`s award (1988) for exceptional scientific contribution.
 
 

As we mark World Antibiotic Awareness Week and European Antibiotic Awareness Day , it is vital that we do all we can to address antimicrobial resistance. The medtech sector supports a wide range of tools that reduce infection risk and support antimicrobial stewardship – some are technologically sophisticated; others are startlingly simple. Checklists are just one way that we can make surgery safer, reduce healthcare-associated infections, and support antibiotic stewardship. In 2006, Peter Pronovost, a critical care specialist at Johns Hopkins University, designed a checklist to tackle central line infections in intensive care units (ICU). On a sheet of plain paper, he plotted out the steps to take in order to avoid infections when putting in a central line. Doctors are supposed to: wash their hands with soap; clean the patient's skin with chlorhexidine antiseptic; place sterilised drapes over the entire patient; wear a mask, hat, sterile gown and gloves; and put a sterile dressing over the site once the line is in. These steps are no brainers; they have been known and taught for years. So, it seemed silly to make checklist for something so obvious. Pronovost asked the nurses on his ICU to observe the doctors for a month as they put lines into patients and record how often they carried out each step. In more than one third of patients, doctors skipped at least one step. He and his team later persuaded the Johns Hopkins Hospital administration to authorise nurses to stop doctors if they saw them skipping a step on the checklist. A year afterwards, Pronovost and his colleagues monitored what happened. The results were so dramatic that they weren't sure whether to believe them: the ten-day line infection rate went from 11% to zero. So, they monitored patients for 15 more months. Only two line...
“All men make mistakes, but a good man yields when he knows his course is wrong, and repairs the evil. The only crime is pride.”— Sophocles, Antigone Just two decades ago, in the late ‘90s, the Institute of Medicine presented shocking statistics, comparing the death occurring from medical errors to the equivalent of a jumbo jet crashing every day. As a result, patient safety came into sharper focus and was recognised as a global challenge that requires skills and knowledge in many areas, including human factors. In Europe, the statistics are similarly worrying and fuelled by cases where surgeons implant wrong organs into the patient, or even worse – bring the wrong patient into surgery. Recognizing the significant risk to surgical patients, the topic has received attention from international organizations, such as the World Health Organisation (WHO), which published guidelines to improve patient safety in the operating theatre. A 19-item checklist was designed with the goal of reducing the rate of major surgical complications during three time-critical checkpoints: sign-in, timeout, and sign-out. Briefings carried out by operating theatre teams provide an opportunity to identify and resolve issues before a case starts. Debriefings at the end of the theatre list support reflective learning on what went well and what could be done better tomorrow. The checklist also helps to improve the reliability of essential surgical processes by prompting the surgical team to anticipate and prepare for potential problems. It forces a brief period of reflection (the ‘time out’) in which the theatre team works through a series of questions aimed at highlighting potential problems. Indeed, the checklist has contributed to the overall reduction of mortality in surgery and enhanced communication among theatre staff. From the medical device standpoint, its implementation is critical as it allows demonstrating potentially avoidable adverse events when...