Ian Hay

Ian has worked in Telecommunications for over 24 years where he has performed a wide range of roles:  initially focussing on designing and developing IT and Network support systems, culminating in creating an IT and Network department from scratch in Sweden; then moving on to a more strategic role looking at new technologies and how they might be internalised through concept development, prototyping and rapid development.These roles provided Ian with a strong technical foundation that enabled him to move to International standardisation and Ecosystem development to lead global projects.  The most notable project to date is the successful launch of the Universal Charger which involved negotiating in large multinational settings to reach consensus across manufacturers and mobile network operators.More recently Ian is acknowledged as an expert in Health standards where he has acquired knowledge and understanding as a result of occupying several prominent positions within the Continua Health Alliance where he began by driving the Mobility Task Force.In March 2012 Ian was unanimously elected as the Chair of the Technical Working Group at Continua, managing the expert group to deliver the Design Guidelines that form the basis of Interoperable healthcare standards that are increasingly being adopted globally.Ian is also a leading contributor to the GSMA mHealth task force where he represents the mobile industry at the EU & COCIR Working Groups on medical software on regulatory impact and business models for mHealth.

cyclists interoperability devices
In September 2013 I went for a truly inspirational bike trip across 5 countries, covering over 2100 km from Brussels to Barcelona. Many of my fellow cyclists were Type 1 diabetics and the trip was organized to give insight into how issues of interoperability can be resolved. The fundamental problem facing people with diabetes (PWD) is keeping their Blood Glucose (BG) levels within a normal range. To do this PWD use devices to monitor their BG levels. These devices provide a reading that is then used to make therapeutic decisions such as taking insulin or treating a low reading by eating.