Luca Segantini

Luca Segantini is executive director of the International Society of Nephrology (www.theisn.org), a global humanitarian organization devoted to advancing kidney care and to bridging gaps between the developed and the developing world. Luca joined ISN in 2009, and, together with the Society team, helped ISN deliver two very successful congresses in Vancouver and Hong Kong, whilst transitioning the ISN from association management to independent status. Prior to ISN, Luca had management responsibility in marketing, publishing and communications, and was a successful entrepreneur, launching a global association in the field of business process outsourcing.

Tomorrow, 10 th of March, we celebrate World Kidney Day. Around the world, doctors, nurses, patients and the general public have an opportunity to highlight the importance of kidney disease prevention, as well as the added value of screening for early signs of kidney disease. This year, the focus of World Kidney Day is kidney disease in childhood and, by extension, kidney disease in adulthood that has its roots in childhood. For those children who require renal replacement therapy (RRT) for acute and chronic kidney injury, access to the mentioned therapy (either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis) is more difficult than it is for adults. In developed countries, RRT keeps over 2 million people alive worldwide, but optimal equipment and resources for children may not always be available. On the other hand, many developing countries have no readily accessible and affordable RRT programs, even for adults. Thus, patients who require these life-saving treatments may not survive unless they travel outside their home country for treatment. RRT in children is accessible only with extreme difficulty in many parts of developing countries, as equipment is either not available or hard to obtain. In addition, it is difficult to formulate policies to improve access to RRT for children. A widespread problem that affects the care of children in all parts of the world… Recently, a leading nephrologist from California was involved in arranging dialysis treatment for a 10-year old child. However, no single nephrologist or dialysis center in over a 100-mile radius felt comfortable treating a child. The family was thereby forced to drive 90-120 minutes to and then from a dialysis center in Los Angeles. Such a situation in a developed area of the world suggests that mandatory 1-2 month pediatric nephrology rotations would be important for adult nephrologist fellows during their training,...