Michelle Brennan

Michelle Brennan, Chair of the Board of MedTech Europe and Company Group Chair, Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies, Europe, Middle East & Africa (EMEA). 

Medical technologies can add value for patients, healthcare professionals and health systems. However, this must go hand-in-hand with safety. After all, the fundamental tenet of healthcare professionals is Primum non nocere : ‘first, do no harm’. I see our industry's role as an important player in a health system that helps people get better, safely . Patient safety must sit at the heart of our industry agenda if we wish to deliver true value every day and in the most impactful ways. The good news is that by enhancing safety we add value. For example, reducing healthcare-associated infections improves patient outcomes but also accelerates surgical recovery times, reduces time spent in hospital, and saves time for health professionals. I am proud of the role that our sector plays in reducing preventable harms and minimizing healthcare costs. However, until all safety gaps are closed, we must continue to support and enhance best practices. Our sectors should always strive to do more to improve patient safety with the physical and figurative tools that we place in the hands of care providers. Driving the debate forward Infection Prevention Week (14-20 October) is a timely reminder of the need to improve patient safety. I believe we will one day achieve a world without surgery-related infections. This is a big, shared task: collaboration is key. It is not the remit of just one individual or one organisation. It requires multiple stakeholders across the entire patient pathway to unite. Only together will our vision of a world free of surgery-related infections come to fruition. To help us chart a course to an infection-free future for surgery patients, the Clinical Services Journal , in partnership with Johnson & Johnson, is publishing a series of interviews with thought leaders in infection prevention and patient safety. I believe this...
During my tenure in the medical technology industry, including in my role as Chair of the Board of MedTech Europe, I have been honored and humbled on countless occasions to see the results of our industry’s contribution to healthcare delivery. This week marks another of these occasions. Each year in June, MedTech Week offers a collective opportunity to take a step back as an industry to observe, celebrate but also anticipate the impact that medical technology can have on patient lives and health outcomes in Europe. Currently, we are riding perhaps the steepest evolutionary curve in our history. We are thinking smarter and working harder to bring the best possible solutions to health systems, care providers and patients. Our longstanding mission to deliver value at every stage of the care pathway means undergoing a medical procedure today has never been safer, and predictive patient outcomes continue to improve. To maintain care standards, it is our responsibility to never settle for existing best practices, and to always strive to improve the physical and figurative tools in the hands of our care providers. Our commitment is unwavering in the support of patient-centered, evidence-based healthcare, and the role medtech plays in improving people’s health and wellbeing across Europe is more important today than ever before. But what about tomorrow? It is universally agreed that our ageing population and the increasing prevalence of chronic disease will be one of the greatest barriers to high quality and sustainable healthcare in Europe’s future. Despite the strain this is already placing on resources, health systems must expand access to medical technologies while also improving efficiencies that will put value at the forefront of care: enhancing patient experience and improving outcomes while reducing costs. The medtech industry is uniquely positioned to work collaboratively with decision makers to help...