Nadim YARED

Nadim Yared is the President and Chief Executive Officer of CVRx. He had previously served as Vice President and General Manager of Medtronic Navigation, the leading supplier of integrated image-guided surgery products in the world, from 2002 – 2006. He also worked at GE Medical for 10-years, where he had been Vice President of Global Marketing for the OEC Medical Systems and Vice President and General Manager of GE’s European X-ray business based in Paris. Mr. Yared has an engineering degree from Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Télécommunications, and an MBA from INSEAD, France. Mr. Yared is a member of the Board of Directors for AdvaMed, MDIC, and CVRx. In addition, Mr. Yared has recently served as the Chairman of the AdvaMed Accel Board and he is currently the chairman of the AdvaMed Board of Directors. This is the first time that the CEO of a small company has become chairman of the AdvaMed Board of Directors in the 41 years of existence of the organization. Finally, Mr. Yared is one of the “100 people to know in 2017”, according to Minneapolis’ Twin Cities Business Magazine.

Nadim Yared is President and Chief Executive Officer of CVRx and Chairman of the AdvaMed’s Board of Directors, our sister organisation in the United States. He is a speaker at the MedTech Forum 2018 and his sessions include: CEO #NOFILTER and The MedTech Europe Code as a Business Enabler, both on Thursday 25th of January. For more information go to the MTF website and follow #MTF2018 on Twitter. The toss of a dice. An incoming tornado. The decline of investment in medtech. Each of these events could be considered a butterfly effect – the notion that small causes can have broad effects. The medical device industry is undergoing tremendous tectonic shifts, where advances in technology are crossing new boundaries in the medical device space and widening horizons for patients. Internally, our industry has been evolving in response to these advancements. R&D teams have become more digital, more connected, more in-tune with the trends of Silicon Valley. Internet companies are empowering patients with information that enables them to control their destiny more than ever before. Patient advocacy groups are getting stronger and more influential. With this in mind, you might assume that our industry is growing healthy and that our innovation ecosystem is vibrant. Well, maybe. The number of U.S. patents in our field is at an all-time high. However, the translation of that innovation into products that are actually accessible to patients is bottlenecked. And the canaries in the mine here are the small medtech companies. I have seen the number of new medical device companies being formed fall over the past decade. In fact, ten years ago there were four times as many new companies as there were last year. While the total funds allocated by venture firms have been reduced by half, the average investment required by a...