Philippe Cleuziat

Philippe Cleuziat graduated as PhD in Molecular Microbiology from the Claude Bernard University of Lyon and holds a Master of Science in Biochemistry from the INSA Engineering School, France. He is currently Senior Director of Public-Private Partnerships in the Open Innovation & Partnerships Department of bioMérieux. He was formerly Research Program Director for new technologies, products and systems in the Microbiology Business area. Philippe Cleuziat contributed to the foundation and launch of BIOASTER, a Technology Research Institute in microbiology, as Director of Research Programs and Portfolio. He previously managed personalized medicine transversal programs with various partners in the fields of infectious diseases, cancer, and rare genetic disorders as Innovation Programs Director at Institut Mérieux. He has held various senior positions in R&D Departments of Institut Mérieux companies, including SMEs, public-private joint laboratories and entrepreneurial initiatives for technology transfer and development.

 

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For decades, companies in the medtech and pharma sectors have delivered healthcare innovations separately – collaboration has been limited. However, we know that this is not how patients experience healthcare. In the real world, diagnostics, devices, medicines, vaccines and digital tools combine to keep people healthy and to treat those who are unwell. This reality is reflected in the new EU PPP for Health which will launch next year. It is the successor to the Innovative Medicines Initiative ( IMI ) – a public-private partnership between the European Commission and the research-based pharmaceutical industry. Whereas IMI focused primarily on medicines development, the new initiative holds significant new opportunities for those working on devices, diagnostics and digital. It represents the entire value chain, putting patients at the centre. This is reflected in the five pillars on which it is built: precision medicine, integrated care, digital health, citizen/patient empowerment and value. The COVID-19 crisis highlights the need to accelerate collaboration in these areas. Take digital health, for example. We have seen an increased appetite for embracing remote care and telemonitoring as health authorities – and patients – seek to reduce hospital visits. Diagnostics have also shown their worth during the crisis as testing took centre-stage in efforts to identify cases and limit new infections. Digitally-enabled care pathways are coming where data, analytics and dashboards are key to ensure flow of information and timely interventions. However, diagnostics are often the unsung heroes of healthcare. This is one area where the focus on value could help health systems to invest in innovations that deliver better outcomes and contain overall costs. The PPP for Health is an opportunity to step up Europe’s capacity to measure patient outcomes and the long-term wellbeing of our citizens. It is time to think hard about the value of prevention...