Prof. Rudy Nuijts

Prof. Rudy Nuijts is a consultant ophthalmologist at Maastricht UMC.

High-tech innovation and advanced surgical techniques have transformed the field of ophthalmology, with new treatment options making surgery faster and more accurate. We speak to Professor Rudy Nuijts, a leader in the field of cataract surgery, about the radical changes he has seen and what the future may hold. How has cataract care changed since you began working as an ophthalmic surgeon ? I was trained in extracapsular surgery which involved making incisions of at least 6mm to remove the patient’s lens. In the early 1990s, ophthalmologists in the Netherlands started to embrace phacoemulsification – a new alternative where the lens is broken into tiny fragments using ultrasound energy before being removed. That changed everything. How did these advances help patients? The recovery process was much faster and there was less post-operative astigmatism . Since then, technology has improved further: the machinery we use results in a more stable anterior chamber, with less risk of posterior capsule rupture and there is much more choice and versatility in the range of lenses available for implantation. Are there other technological advances that have improved outcomes for patients? The introduction of multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) has meant patients can be spectacle-independent after cataract surgery. Instead of just fixing the cloudy vision caused by their cataract, patients can now have a refractive lens implanted which improves their vision. These include toric IOLs which allow us to correct astigmatism and make patients spectacle independent for distance. Another big leap forward has been multifocal lenses. Most surgeons in Europe have, over the last year or two, moved from bifocal to trifocal lenses. This has big advantages for patients. For example, with multifocal trifocal lenses they can read at intermediate distances – for iPads or reading a computer screen, this is a distinct advantage. Bifocal lenses were...