career

We’re at the heart of the global response to COVID-19, a powerful reminder of our mission to enable our customers to make the world healthier,cleaner and safer. What’s driving us every day is the feeling that there is a meaning to our work over and beyond the reward of the paycheck. What’s compelling now is that we see more people that are framing their careers in a different light. Many people that work in roles outside of typical life science areas are now considering this industry for the first time ever, and they are starting to see that they can transfer their skills from other industries and make an impact in the life sciences sector – a mindset shift that expands the talent pool for the MedTech and Life Science industry. Like many other organisations within our sector, we have accelerated projects scheduled to take months and years to a timeline of a few days and weeks, and this in all aspects of the COVID-19 response, including virus research, diagnostic testing components and capabilities, PPE, vaccine and therapy production. Considering the breadth of this value chain, we’ve had to significantly increase our hiring in certain areas to meet this unprecedented demand. Our requisition volume is up 100% over last year and we are hiring at a speed and scale historically never seen. Looking ahead, the investment in healthcare systems will continue, driven by governments on a national level to bolster capabilities in diagnostics and vaccine development to better protect themselves. There are also large global initiatives like the ‘Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator’ and COVAX, multi-national collaborations with the involvement of more than two thirds of the world to accelerate development, production, and equitable access to diagnostics, treatments, and vaccines. There will be a huge demand for what we...
Love at first sight At the age of seventeen, I was good in Math and Sciences, but I did not know what to study after secondary school. Five years later, I was going to be graduated from ULB (Brussels university) as a mechanical engineer, dedicating myself to mechanical structures and engines development. Then, through my final year thesis, it hit me: my first project in Biomedical Engineering. I was a newbie there: what is Biomedical Engineering? What does the development of this kind of products require? How to manage physiological parameters that are not programmable, very complex and varying from one person to another? It happened to be so interesting that it set me to the path of Life Sciences and Healthcare, losing all other interest to more classic mechanics. From then on, I have worked in the MedTech field dealing with very innovative and high-risk medical devices, such as active implants. What I find the most motivating and rewarding is to take part in the development of solutions that improve and save people's lives. Going further... In 2016, I started up my own Medical Devices engineering company with the goal to support manufacturers and help them succeed in their product development. Since then it has been growing up to almost ten people all specialized in research, development, quality assurance and regulatory affairs. Today we work on a very large panel of devices all presenting their own set of challenges. ... to a healthier tomorrow Looking back at the last thirteen years I am happy with what I have achieved but above all I feel lucky to have found this inspiring field where there is still so much to be done! I would like to underline the importance of promoting Biomedical Engineering studies but also teach and train students in...