dialysis

Dialysis can be essential to the wellbeing of people living with kidney failure. However, many patients have concerns about the impact of regular dialysis on their daily activity. Will they lose independence? Will it affect their family and professional lives? Today there are technological solutions that allow patients to adapt their treatment to their way of life – and not vice versa. With peritoneal dialysis, the therapy can be delivered at home, without needing to go to a medical centre. For suitable patients, this enables dialysis to be performed while they sleep, thus allowing them to maintain their personal and work activity by day. Web connectivity platforms enable remote monitoring, so that the process can be supervised and controlled by specialists. This provides patients with security and confidence. Patients choice It is important that patients participate actively in the choice of their treatment, as they know best how dialysis will impact their daily lives. In Spain, a multi-stakeholder organisation – the Support Group for the Development of Peritoneal Dialysis (GADDPE) – was established in 2009 to raise awareness of the treatment options available to people with kidney failure. The group has highlighted the low uptake of peritoneal dialysis in Spain in several ways, including through a recent video by the EuropaPress.tv agency in Madrid. The short film features testimony from patients, as well as a doctor, about dialysis and its impact on patients’ lives. The goal is to illustrate why some patients might choose to have peritoneal dialysis at home. Research has shown that when kidney patients receive adequate information about the available treatments, 50% of those who start dialysis choose peritoneal dialysis at home. However, figures of the use of peritoneal dialysis are strikingly low in Spain: only 5% of patients who require renal replacement therapy use this option...
This blog is part of the Early Diagnosis campaign #BeFirst Early diagnosis and care can prevent illness from developing and slow disease progression. Lab tests, genetic tests, tests for chronic diseases and modern lab diagnostics can help facilitate earlier intervention and improves outcomes for patients and are increasingly valuable in informing treatment choice. Read the other blogs here: Why should we prevent cervical cancer? Because we can , A smarter way to fight colorectal cancer , Can screening decrease lung cancer mortality rates? , For kidney disease patients, treatment education and choice are key to better outcomes , Diagnosing severe hearing loss and deafness ****************************************** Chronic kidney disease is a major concern for healthcare providers worldwide. Tests that allow efficient and accurate diagnosis are vital. We all know someone living with chronic kidney disease (CKD) – even if they have not yet been diagnosed: it is estimated that 10 percent of the global population is affected by CKD 1 . Between 1990 and 2010, kidney disease became one of the fastest-growing causes of death in the world, second only to HIV/AIDS. 1 Reviewing the data on CKD diagnosis, we were struck by how timely detection can impact patient outcomes. Catching kidney disease in the early stages is a challenge, since there are typically no overt signs or symptoms. However, if CKD is detected early and managed appropriately, the deterioration in kidney function can be slowed and the risk of associated cardiovascular complications reduced. 2 For patients, this can make all the difference, but we know too that there is a real impact for health systems where demand is rising and resources may be scarce. CKD also represents more than €1 trillion in healthcare costs over the next decade. 3 Key indicators of kidney function So, what are the tell-tale signs...
This blog is part of the Early Diagnosis campaign #BeFirst Early diagnosis and care can prevent illness from developing and slow disease progression. Lab tests, genetic tests, tests for chronic diseases and modern lab diagnostics can help facilitate earlier intervention and improves outcomes for patients and are increasingly valuable in informing treatment choice. Read the other blogs here: A smarter way to fight colorectal cancer , Why should we prevent cervical cancer? Because we can , Diagnosing severe hearing loss and deafness , Can screening decrease lung cancer mortality rates? and Kidney Disease: catch it early to save lives and money . *************************************************** To me, modern healthcare should be about improving patient outcomes and offering patients as much choice as possible. All of us are patients at certain times in our lives. Shouldn’t we have greater input into how and where we are treated? When it comes to kidney disease, not all patients have time to consider their options and prepare for treatment. To understand why this is, let me explain a little about the condition. Kidney disease is a major and growing burden in Europe . One in ten Europeans has some form of kidney disease but most don’t know it . However, kidney failure is a ‘silent disease’, often diagnosed in the late stages. This significantly narrows the treatment options available to patients, often leading to worse outcomes. For some, late diagnosis denies them the opportunity to learn about and to discuss home dialysis with their doctors. Clinical guidelines – such as the NICE clinical guidance on peritoneal dialysis –recommend that stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients should be informed of all treatment options so that they can choose the one that best fits their lifestyle. Time to explore treatment options The best treatment for kidney failure is...
What is your day-to-day work like? How do you help improve or save people's lives through your work? I am in charge of a home dialysis program in Helsinki. In my department, we take care of the education and training of patients to prepare them for therapy. In Finland, we have been active in this field from the early 80s. There are about 500 dialysis patients in our hospital district, 35% of whom are treated at home. We believe that home therapy is best for the patients. It does not only provide the best quality of life and outcomes, but it also allows for the treatment to be more personalised. It is in fact a win-win-win: for patients to be able to recover at home and get the best treatment, for healthcare professionals to be able to deliver the best care with limited staff and for society in terms of costs to the economy and healthcare. From early on, patients are able to choose the treatment best suited to them, thanks to the information available to them. It is important to not only provide this information to the patients, but also to their family. What do you think are the top three challenges facing the healthcare system and your profession in particular? One of the biggest challenges is the ageing population and the growing number of patients with end-stage renal failure. In the meantime, resources such as money or healthcare staff are lacking in order to balance the demands on the system. Finally, we should be up to date about technological and medical developments in our respective fields. The world is changing and we need to be able to adapt to these changes and understand the new demands. What role do you see for medical technologies to address these challenges?...
Tomorrow, 10 th of March, we celebrate World Kidney Day. Around the world, doctors, nurses, patients and the general public have an opportunity to highlight the importance of kidney disease prevention, as well as the added value of screening for early signs of kidney disease. This year, the focus of World Kidney Day is kidney disease in childhood and, by extension, kidney disease in adulthood that has its roots in childhood. For those children who require renal replacement therapy (RRT) for acute and chronic kidney injury, access to the mentioned therapy (either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis) is more difficult than it is for adults. In developed countries, RRT keeps over 2 million people alive worldwide, but optimal equipment and resources for children may not always be available. On the other hand, many developing countries have no readily accessible and affordable RRT programs, even for adults. Thus, patients who require these life-saving treatments may not survive unless they travel outside their home country for treatment. RRT in children is accessible only with extreme difficulty in many parts of developing countries, as equipment is either not available or hard to obtain. In addition, it is difficult to formulate policies to improve access to RRT for children. A widespread problem that affects the care of children in all parts of the world… Recently, a leading nephrologist from California was involved in arranging dialysis treatment for a 10-year old child. However, no single nephrologist or dialysis center in over a 100-mile radius felt comfortable treating a child. The family was thereby forced to drive 90-120 minutes to and then from a dialysis center in Los Angeles. Such a situation in a developed area of the world suggests that mandatory 1-2 month pediatric nephrology rotations would be important for adult nephrologist fellows during their training,...
Throughout the EU, Member States are looking for ways to provide patient-centred care to maximize clinical outcomes and improve cost-effectiveness for healthcare systems. For many countries, this means re-organisation of how care is delivered and in some cases general cost-cutting to sustain the system. So, when policymakers are faced with difficult decisions about how to maintain quality of care within a resource constrained system why is it that they should care about dialysis?