eu policy

The medtech industry in Europe is made up almost uniquely of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs). These have brought incredible innovations to patients, healthcare systems, the economy and society, and will continue to do so in the future. But if we put ever more data demands on these companies, in return, they need to be able to operate in a clear, efficient and predictable funding environment. Pop-quiz: What is the most innovative industry in Europe, measured by patents filed? It’s not the ICT industry. No, it’s not the pharma industry neither… It’s the medical technology industry, a sector that in general files over 10,000 patents per year. And it’s the SMEs that make up 95% of this sector in Europe that are the drivers of innovation. These deliver value at every level: Patients live longer, healthier lives Healthcare systems can use products that make more efficient use of limited resources European economies benefit from a brake on rising healthcare expenditure, while The medtech industry creates jobs (over 575,000 of them!) and growth (a positive trade balance of €15 billion). The medtech SMEs in Europe form a rich ecosystem that we cannot simply equate to the pharmaceutical sector, which in Europe is predominantly made up of multinationals and has product lifecycles of 10-15 years. At the same time, healthcare systems want more data and evidence of the value of innovations. The medtech industry, including SMEs, are committed to providing this data. However, while large multinational companies can easily move around (human) resources to cope with the additional work, this is much more difficult to do for companies that work with staff of between 1 and 250 people. Moreover, new legislation set to be introduced in a number of member states will considerably impact how innovations get reimbursed. Germany for instance has...
From 15 to 21 June the European medtech industry will organise its first “European MedTech Week”, a series of activities and events to celebrate medical technology throughout Europe. This week will be an opportunity for every healthcare stakeholder to experience a whole range of medical technologies in the convenience of their own country. The medtech industry will showcase its innovativeness in unique and creative ways. So what can you do to make sure you benefit to the fullest from this week? Outside of the circle of healthcare stakeholders it is clear the role and value of medical technology is not yet well understood. Do the test yourself and ask your spouse, parents or friends about the value of our innovations. Chances are they won’t be able to come up with much more beyond ‘’They allow me to be healthy again following a medical intervention”. What’s clear from this is that the majority of people are unaware of the vastness of our industry, nor the value it brings at multiple levels. Lots of material on this very topic is already available widely on the internet (we have a great infographic here , moving stories here and several blogs here ). But together with our member companies and associations, we also want to share more about medical technology throughout Europe. What is the MedTech Week? Organised for the first time this year, the “European MedTech Week” is a series of events that will be organised throughout Europe from 15 until 21 June and which will put the value of medical technology front and centre. At European level, we will be coordinating the various events and initiatives being organised, and curating all material – photos, videos, … - on the event's website which will be launched shortly. But the real action will take...
A rise in the spread of new diseases, such as Ebola, and the resurgence of diseases that were once considered under control, like malaria, have captured the world’s attention and raised awareness of the risks of infectious disease. Add to this the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance caused by the use and misuse of antimicrobials over the past 70 years, and it is clear that there is an urgent need for the development of new diagnostics and medicines that address the way critical infections are diagnosed and treated.
Today is European Antibiotic Awareness Day. Tackling the era of superbugs should be a team sport. Physicians, companies, foundations and the MedTech industry all want to play their part.
When the European Commission published its secondary report on patient safety, it made me wonder why advanced wound care is not higher on the patient safety agenda at EU and national levels? Not that it’s a competition, but the incidence of wounds in the EU is approximately 4 million (!), which is on par with cancer (3,9 mill), cerebrovascular disease (3,9 mill), and diabetes (2 mill.). The wound care debated has progressed for sure, but there’s much more do to be done to make sure than wound care in Europe gets the attention it deserves. The EU’s on the right track, but…
Throughout the EU, Member States are looking for ways to provide patient-centred care to maximize clinical outcomes and improve cost-effectiveness for healthcare systems. For many countries, this means re-organisation of how care is delivered and in some cases general cost-cutting to sustain the system. So, when policymakers are faced with difficult decisions about how to maintain quality of care within a resource constrained system why is it that they should care about dialysis?