home care

Dialysis can be essential to the wellbeing of people living with kidney failure. However, many patients have concerns about the impact of regular dialysis on their daily activity. Will they lose independence? Will it affect their family and professional lives? Today there are technological solutions that allow patients to adapt their treatment to their way of life – and not vice versa. With peritoneal dialysis, the therapy can be delivered at home, without needing to go to a medical centre. For suitable patients, this enables dialysis to be performed while they sleep, thus allowing them to maintain their personal and work activity by day. Web connectivity platforms enable remote monitoring, so that the process can be supervised and controlled by specialists. This provides patients with security and confidence. Patients choice It is important that patients participate actively in the choice of their treatment, as they know best how dialysis will impact their daily lives. In Spain, a multi-stakeholder organisation – the Support Group for the Development of Peritoneal Dialysis (GADDPE) – was established in 2009 to raise awareness of the treatment options available to people with kidney failure. The group has highlighted the low uptake of peritoneal dialysis in Spain in several ways, including through a recent video by the EuropaPress.tv agency in Madrid. The short film features testimony from patients, as well as a doctor, about dialysis and its impact on patients’ lives. The goal is to illustrate why some patients might choose to have peritoneal dialysis at home. Research has shown that when kidney patients receive adequate information about the available treatments, 50% of those who start dialysis choose peritoneal dialysis at home. However, figures of the use of peritoneal dialysis are strikingly low in Spain: only 5% of patients who require renal replacement therapy use this option...
Revolutionising and reinventing Medicine We are currently experiencing a great period of particularly stimulating technological breakthroughs. A great deal of progress is expected in practically all areas of our daily life: health, home, work, consumption, the environment… In the health sector alone, there are plenty of new inventions: you can manage your diabetes with a mobile application, make a prosthesis with a 3D printer, continuously monitor your own statistics and there are new techniques for predictive analysis . These inventions are gradually transforming our approach to health and the relationship between hospitals and patients. As these innovative technologies become more and more widespread, the patient becomes more active in monitoring his own state of health and the hospital’s role is changing: we spend less time in hospital, there’s greater comfort for the patient, and the costs for our social security system are reduced. So, in the long run, medical innovation may improve both the quality of healthcare for the patient and the performance of our health system. At this time of medical innovation, surgical robotics is a particularly promising area. A sign of its potential: surgical robotics alone represents a world market which should reach over 20 billion dollars by 2020! This is mainly due to the boom in minimally invasive surgery, which is a way of operating patients via very small incisions. I created Medtech because I was convinced that this trend was inevitable and positive both for patients and the medical world. By democratising the access to minimally invasive surgery, this technology facilitates and considerably improves the surgical act - serving patients and practitioners - and contributes to the performance of hospital facilities. Let’s transmit and connect these innovations! As innovations are only meaningful when they are shared, surgical robotics also aims to make modern surgery accessible to...
My name is Isabel Saraiva. I’m Portuguese and ex-smoker. I quit smoking in April 2006 when I was diagnosed with COPD, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. COPD is a progressive respiratory disease characterized by the obstruction of lung airflow making breathing difficult. Prevention, which means quitting smoking and access to early diagnostic, is the most important issue for people with this Chronic Respiratory Disease. I was lucky enough to be diagnosed without delay and I succeed in quitting smoking. I can say that my COPD is under control and I have a full, rewarding life. But I’m sure, starting with the diagnosis, that without several categories of medical devices, some of them so ordinary that almost nobody gives them a second look, my life will be completely different: breathless, dependent, depressed, without proper diagnostic and treatment. 1. What medical devices are relevant to your disease area? As a COPD patient, the mandatory monitoring of my condition and coping with the day to day life can’t discard a diversified set of medical devices: from the sophisticated x-Ray, T-scan and spirometry machines needed to evaluate the disease progression, to the inhalers to spread medicines in my lungs, or even the humble syringes needed to take blood in order to evaluate the level of oxygen in my body. Medical devices are always there for me and each and one of them is important for my wellbeing. They provide valuable and accurate information about my health and my condition to my doctor and to me. They help to calibrate my treatment and they make my life safer and more predictable. 2. Have you seen any development in recent years in the treatment of the disease which were helpful to you? The improvement of the drug delivery systems and the inhalation therapy, together with new and...
BVMED, the German national medical devices association, has initiated a campaign to raise awareness about medical devices and empowering patients to be body proud, despite having a medical device. We have translated extracts of Elke’s story as part of European MedTech Week. To view all the stories, click here . Why are you supporting the “Body pride” campaign? I was immediately convinced by the “Body pride” title. It’s a beautiful concept that I fully support. I acquainted myself with the campaign and I thought, “That suits me perfectly!” I endorse it wholeheartedly. When did you receive your diabetes diagnosis? In 1996. I was 13 years old when I received my Type 1 diabetes diagnosis. It’s a chronic disease that I will have my whole life. I take “imported” insulin every day. How did the diabetes make itself noticeable then? I was very thirsty, always tired and found it difficult to concentrate. It was then that my parents took me to our family doctor and he performed a blood glucose test. We knew what it was when there was a very high result. How did you deal with the diagnosis? Initially, diabetes was completely new to me. I simply didn’t want to be ill and preferred to forget about the diagnosis. It was also not externally apparent. Did your lifestyle change as a consequence of the diagnosis? Initially, there was a difficult period because I found myself in a dilemma – I had to learn to understand the disease, but I didn’t wish to do so. Suddenly you have to consider everything you eat and calculate the carbohydrate content exactly. I was often in a state of despair and thought that I wouldn’t be able to overcome it. I didn’t want to hear from the doctors; I thought, ‘what would they...
2015 has been predicted, by many commentators, as the year that digital health will officially ‘’take off’’ due to increased consumer-wide acceptance, a growing array of digitally enabled health applications and increased investment levels. All of these factors are contributing to the cause for more and more leading consumer brands to enter into the digital health space, as product innovation and business growth opportunities present themselves accordingly. The FT Digital Health SummitEurope is bringing together leaders from all parts of the healthcare industry to assess the uptake and advancement of healthcare's digital transformation. With executive leaders from Janssen, Sanofi, Boehringer Ingelheim, GSK and Bayer all speaking at the event you will gain insight into how these pharma companies are prioritising their digital strategies. You will also be able to assess how digital innovations can be incorporated into the everyday doctor-patient relationship through a unique panel discussion exclusively involving Chief Medical Officers . Investment in this sector is of course critical for its success so a diverse panel involving speakers from investment banking, private equity and venture capital will discuss the opportunities as well as the risks in financing digital health. Alongside this, speakers from the likes of Genomics England, the NHS and the European Commission will analyse the regulatory challenges that along with investment formats, form the basis of success in digital health business models and consumer acceptance. What can be done then? Building on the Financial Times’ expertise and coverage of health, life science and digital business, the FT Digital Health Summit Europe will bring together stakeholders from across the healthcare ecosystem – payers, providers, technology, data and life science companies as well as financiers, to bring unique focus and insight into the commercial, economical and regulatory challenges that healthcare’s digital transformation faces when it looks to finally ‘’take...
The practice of medicine is meant to keep people well or help them get well so they can live a full, productive life. Technology provides tools toward that goal. It can help relieve pain and suffering or prevent it. But too often we get so excited about technology we lose sight of what’s really important, helping human beings live better. And when it comes to the millions of people living with chronic conditions, and now “chronic cancers”, we need to really understand their lives with an illness to know how technology can help.