infection

Medical technologies can add value for patients, healthcare professionals and health systems. However, this must go hand-in-hand with safety. After all, the fundamental tenet of healthcare professionals is Primum non nocere : ‘first, do no harm’. I see our industry's role as an important player in a health system that helps people get better, safely . Patient safety must sit at the heart of our industry agenda if we wish to deliver true value every day and in the most impactful ways. The good news is that by enhancing safety we add value. For example, reducing healthcare-associated infections improves patient outcomes but also accelerates surgical recovery times, reduces time spent in hospital, and saves time for health professionals. I am proud of the role that our sector plays in reducing preventable harms and minimizing healthcare costs. However, until all safety gaps are closed, we must continue to support and enhance best practices. Our sectors should always strive to do more to improve patient safety with the physical and figurative tools that we place in the hands of care providers. Driving the debate forward Infection Prevention Week (14-20 October) is a timely reminder of the need to improve patient safety. I believe we will one day achieve a world without surgery-related infections. This is a big, shared task: collaboration is key. It is not the remit of just one individual or one organisation. It requires multiple stakeholders across the entire patient pathway to unite. Only together will our vision of a world free of surgery-related infections come to fruition. To help us chart a course to an infection-free future for surgery patients, the Clinical Services Journal , in partnership with Johnson & Johnson, is publishing a series of interviews with thought leaders in infection prevention and patient safety. I believe this...