patients

The European Patients’ Academy (EUPATI) has trained dozens of patients to engage with companies and decision-makers on medicines development. Now it’s time to think about medtech. I am convinced that the days when experts and clinicians decided what patients want are long gone. Modern healthcare aspires to be patient-centred, while academics, policymakers and industry are increasingly focused on delivering what matters to patients. I have always believed that the best way to find out what patients want is to ask them. Inviting patients into conversations about research priorities, testing medical innovations, and even regulatory and reimbursement, is a win-win. It ensures that innovations answer the needs of patients and make product development more efficient – for example, by enhancing the recruitment and retention of patients in clinical studies. From my point of view, it’s vital that all stakeholders have the skills and knowledge required to engage in the innovation process. Patients need to understand R&D – and other stakeholders should learn how to get the most from their interactions with patients. The Patients’ Academy has played an important part in delivering training courses. Over 150 patients and 2 million users have downloaded the EUPATI Toolbox on Medicines R&D, which features more than 3,500 content items – including articles and PowerPoints, infographics and fact sheets. EUPATI was set up through the Innovative Medicines Initiative, a public-private partnership supported by the European Commission and EFPIA, representing the research-based pharmaceutical sector. We have brought together 30 organisations to fill a gap: by boosting the pool of skilled patients, the Patient Academy helps to meet the growing demand for informed patients through a combination of e-learning courses as well as face to face meetings over a period of 14 months. As you may know, there are major differences in how medical technologies and medicines...
As Europe prepares for a new, inclusive public-private partnership in healthcare, the case for patient engagement is stronger than ever. As far back as 2012, the European Patients’ Forum (EPF) and MedTech Europe sat down to think about how we could work together more closely. We came up with the Patient-Medtech Dialogue – a forum for regular interaction on topics of mutual interest. Now, more than seven years later, the need to collaborate even more closely has grown. At the most recent Patient-Medtech Dialogue workshop in Brussels, we looked at where we are today and how current trends will shape our future collaboration. The conclusion was clear: we are embarking on a new era in multi-stakeholder partnership. An ongoing collaboration among healthcare actors that demands deeper mutual understanding. In concrete terms, patients would benefit to know more about the lifecycle of medical technologies and how products are regulated and financed by health systems. Medical technology companies would benefit to better understand the value patients can bring in setting research priorities and developing products. Learning curve Patients want and should have a role in the innovative process and in conversations about regulation and access. If we are to have a truly patient-centred health system, this is obvious. Take research and innovation as an example: While patients have been playing an increasingly proactive role in medicines development – notably through a number of Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) projects – this knowledge and experience will not automatically transfer to medical devices. The European Commission and healthcare stakeholders are in the process of devising a successor to the IMI – the largest healthcare public-private partnership in the world for health research and innovation. The new public-private partnership will definitely take a much broader view of healthcare -and will seek input from patients and patient...
As healthcare advocates, we know that dialogue between patients and the medical technology industry can deepen understanding between those who develop new healthcare solutions and those who use them. That is why our organisations, the European Patients’ Forum (EPF) and MedTech Europe, devised the Patient-Medtech Dialogue as a forum for regular interaction on topics of mutual interest in a transparent and open way. Our experience to date has been positive: The Patient-MedTech Dialogue is an initiative that began in 2011 with the aim of providing a platform for the exchange of perspectives between the patient and medtech communities. At our latest meetings, on 24 and 25 May, we co-hosted two half-day workshops, exploring two hot topics in healthcare: Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and community care in the context of improving access to medical technologies. We were delighted about the high interest and engagement of the patient organisations and MedTech companies that joined. In addition to the exchange between patients and industry representatives, the dialogue also engages with experts and other stakeholders. For example, these recent sessions benefited from the contributions of a European Commission official and senior representatives of HTAi, and Health First Europe. Health Technology Assessment The first workshop on HTA provided us with an opportunity to exchange perspectives on the European Commission’s legislative proposal on health technology assessment and on common rules for clinical assessment of health technologies undergoing HTA. There were also calls from various participants for greater transparency about how patient involvement in HTA processes translates into decision-making, and detailed discussion of the need for funding and training to ensure effective patient input. Care in the community The second workshop focused on community care – healthcare provided outside the hospital setting. We see technology helping to empower patients to manage their conditions and connect with specialists,...
This blog is part of the Early Diagnosis campaign #BeFirst Early diagnosis and care can prevent illness from developing and slow disease progression. Lab tests, genetic tests, tests for chronic diseases and modern lab diagnostics can help facilitate earlier intervention and improves outcomes for patients and are increasingly valuable in informing treatment choice. Read the other blogs here: A smarter way to fight colorectal cancer , Why should we prevent cervical cancer? Because we can , Diagnosing severe hearing loss and deafness , Can screening decrease lung cancer mortality rates? and Kidney Disease: catch it early to save lives and money . *************************************************** To me, modern healthcare should be about improving patient outcomes and offering patients as much choice as possible. All of us are patients at certain times in our lives. Shouldn’t we have greater input into how and where we are treated? When it comes to kidney disease, not all patients have time to consider their options and prepare for treatment. To understand why this is, let me explain a little about the condition. Kidney disease is a major and growing burden in Europe . One in ten Europeans has some form of kidney disease but most don’t know it . However, kidney failure is a ‘silent disease’, often diagnosed in the late stages. This significantly narrows the treatment options available to patients, often leading to worse outcomes. For some, late diagnosis denies them the opportunity to learn about and to discuss home dialysis with their doctors. Clinical guidelines – such as the NICE clinical guidance on peritoneal dialysis –recommend that stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients should be informed of all treatment options so that they can choose the one that best fits their lifestyle. Time to explore treatment options The best treatment for kidney failure is...
Digital technologies provide an opportunity to move musculoskeletal care to the heart of value-based healthcare. MedTech Views spoke to Satschin Bansal of Zimmer Biomet about some of the innovations that will change the field. Will digital health deliver the Holy Grail of better results for patients and better value for health systems? The technologies we have today, and those I see emerging from start-ups, are more than capable of changing musculoskeletal care. These digital tools contribute to the promise of value-based healthcare – improving patient outcomes while allowing greater cost-effectiveness. Digital health has to deliver both of these elements if it is to be adopted widely. What kinds of technologies are you thinking of? Think of rehabilitation after a knee or hip replacement. The six weeks after surgery are crucial to the patients’ quality of life after they recover. A major challenge, particularly in older patient populations, is patient compliance with physiotherapy. One of the solutions is to use wearable devices with sensors that give biofeedback to patients on whether they are bending their knee correctly or whether their mobility has improved. It can become like a “game”, making them more likely to stick to exercising. How else could technology improve rehabilitation without adding costs? The major costs of rehab are performing physiotherapy at a clinic and then later at home. The strong increase in using mobile technology also among elderly patients means physiotherapy can be delivered remotely. The physio could, for example, programme exercises for the patient to do in their own time – and then review the data afterwards. This helps each physiotherapist work more effectively with a larger number of patients – which is crucial as our population ages. In addition, further reducing length of stay in hospitals after joint replacement allows patients to return to their...
This blog is part 9 of a series on the MEAT value-based procurement project, an initiative that advocates towards a shift from price-based procurement towards value-based procurement. It does so by defining a Most Economically Advantageous Tendering (MEAT) framework that includes the value of medical technologies, services and solutions in procurement processes across Europe. Read part 1 , part 2 , part 3 , part 4 , part 5 , part 6 , part 7 and part 8 . Health systems across the globe are faced with unprecedented challenges. Demand and patient expectations are rising while financial resources are diminishing. To respond to these trends, we need a new approach to how we manage healthcare. At NHS North West Procurement Development, we have been looking at how rethinking procurement can deliver better outcomes for patients, increased savings opportunities, and wider operational efficiencies. We began exploring the principles and practices of ‘Value Based Procurement’ (VBP) in 2014. By working with the University of Liverpool and engaging with a wide range of stakeholders – including ICHOM, legal experts, suppliers and MedTech Europe – we have studied how VBP can work in practice and the changes needed to make it commonplace. New framework for change To move this process to the next stage, we have published a 30-page guide setting out the rational for embracing VBP, providing a framework for delivering change, and setting our vision for the future. We want this to inform the work of procurement officials and suppliers alike, to inspire health professionals, patients, policymakers and others to change how they think about preparing our health system for the future. Hospitals are busy places and there is rarely time to take a breath and consider reforming the system. That’s why we have aimed to make the new guide clear, concise...