patients

As healthcare advocates, we know that dialogue between patients and the medical technology industry can deepen understanding between those who develop new healthcare solutions and those who use them. That is why our organisations, the European Patients’ Forum (EPF) and MedTech Europe, devised the Patient-Medtech Dialogue as a forum for regular interaction on topics of mutual interest in a transparent and open way. Our experience to date has been positive: The Patient-MedTech Dialogue is an initiative that began in 2011 with the aim of providing a platform for the exchange of perspectives between the patient and medtech communities. At our latest meetings, on 24 and 25 May, we co-hosted two half-day workshops, exploring two hot topics in healthcare: Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and community care in the context of improving access to medical technologies. We were delighted about the high interest and engagement of the patient organisations and MedTech companies that joined. In addition to the exchange between patients and industry representatives, the dialogue also engages with experts and other stakeholders. For example, these recent sessions benefited from the contributions of a European Commission official and senior representatives of HTAi, and Health First Europe. Health Technology Assessment The first workshop on HTA provided us with an opportunity to exchange perspectives on the European Commission’s legislative proposal on health technology assessment and on common rules for clinical assessment of health technologies undergoing HTA. There were also calls from various participants for greater transparency about how patient involvement in HTA processes translates into decision-making, and detailed discussion of the need for funding and training to ensure effective patient input. Care in the community The second workshop focused on community care – healthcare provided outside the hospital setting. We see technology helping to empower patients to manage their conditions and connect with specialists,...
This blog is part of the Early Diagnosis campaign #BeFirst Early diagnosis and care can prevent illness from developing and slow disease progression. Lab tests, genetic tests, tests for chronic diseases and modern lab diagnostics can help facilitate earlier intervention and improves outcomes for patients and are increasingly valuable in informing treatment choice. Read the other blogs here: A smarter way to fight colorectal cancer , Why should we prevent cervical cancer? Because we can , Diagnosing severe hearing loss and deafness , Can screening decrease lung cancer mortality rates? and Kidney Disease: catch it early to save lives and money . *************************************************** To me, modern healthcare should be about improving patient outcomes and offering patients as much choice as possible. All of us are patients at certain times in our lives. Shouldn’t we have greater input into how and where we are treated? When it comes to kidney disease, not all patients have time to consider their options and prepare for treatment. To understand why this is, let me explain a little about the condition. Kidney disease is a major and growing burden in Europe . One in ten Europeans has some form of kidney disease but most don’t know it . However, kidney failure is a ‘silent disease’, often diagnosed in the late stages. This significantly narrows the treatment options available to patients, often leading to worse outcomes. For some, late diagnosis denies them the opportunity to learn about and to discuss home dialysis with their doctors. Clinical guidelines – such as the NICE clinical guidance on peritoneal dialysis –recommend that stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients should be informed of all treatment options so that they can choose the one that best fits their lifestyle. Time to explore treatment options The best treatment for kidney failure is...
Digital technologies provide an opportunity to move musculoskeletal care to the heart of value-based healthcare. MedTech Views spoke to Satschin Bansal of Zimmer Biomet about some of the innovations that will change the field. Will digital health deliver the Holy Grail of better results for patients and better value for health systems? The technologies we have today, and those I see emerging from start-ups, are more than capable of changing musculoskeletal care. These digital tools contribute to the promise of value-based healthcare – improving patient outcomes while allowing greater cost-effectiveness. Digital health has to deliver both of these elements if it is to be adopted widely. What kinds of technologies are you thinking of? Think of rehabilitation after a knee or hip replacement. The six weeks after surgery are crucial to the patients’ quality of life after they recover. A major challenge, particularly in older patient populations, is patient compliance with physiotherapy. One of the solutions is to use wearable devices with sensors that give biofeedback to patients on whether they are bending their knee correctly or whether their mobility has improved. It can become like a “game”, making them more likely to stick to exercising. How else could technology improve rehabilitation without adding costs? The major costs of rehab are performing physiotherapy at a clinic and then later at home. The strong increase in using mobile technology also among elderly patients means physiotherapy can be delivered remotely. The physio could, for example, programme exercises for the patient to do in their own time – and then review the data afterwards. This helps each physiotherapist work more effectively with a larger number of patients – which is crucial as our population ages. In addition, further reducing length of stay in hospitals after joint replacement allows patients to return to their...
This blog is part 9 of a series on the MEAT value-based procurement project, an initiative that advocates towards a shift from price-based procurement towards value-based procurement. It does so by defining a Most Economically Advantageous Tendering (MEAT) framework that includes the value of medical technologies, services and solutions in procurement processes across Europe. Read part 1 , part 2 , part 3 , part 4 , part 5 , part 6 , part 7 and part 8 . Health systems across the globe are faced with unprecedented challenges. Demand and patient expectations are rising while financial resources are diminishing. To respond to these trends, we need a new approach to how we manage healthcare. At NHS North West Procurement Development, we have been looking at how rethinking procurement can deliver better outcomes for patients, increased savings opportunities, and wider operational efficiencies. We began exploring the principles and practices of ‘Value Based Procurement’ (VBP) in 2014. By working with the University of Liverpool and engaging with a wide range of stakeholders – including ICHOM, legal experts, suppliers and MedTech Europe – we have studied how VBP can work in practice and the changes needed to make it commonplace. New framework for change To move this process to the next stage, we have published a 30-page guide setting out the rational for embracing VBP, providing a framework for delivering change, and setting our vision for the future. We want this to inform the work of procurement officials and suppliers alike, to inspire health professionals, patients, policymakers and others to change how they think about preparing our health system for the future. Hospitals are busy places and there is rarely time to take a breath and consider reforming the system. That’s why we have aimed to make the new guide clear, concise...
By unleashing the power of machine learning, we can better understand behaviour, empower patients to make smarter decisions – and save billions of euros . Unhealthy lifestyles are driving an explosion in chronic conditions, including obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. By choosing to smoke, having an inconsistency in maintaining a healthy diet and opting out of exercising, we place ourselves at risk of ill-health. At the same time, some patients are neglecting to take their medicines as prescribed or are misusing antibiotics – with devastating consequences. Around twenty–one percent (21%) of US healthcare costs are attributable to the influence of human behaviour. For example, poor medication adherence alone costs the US more than $100 billion annually. Harvard and the World Economic Forum have estimated that non-communicable diseases result in economic losses for developing economies equivalent to four to five percent (4-5%) of their GDP per annum. A patient-centric approach to behaviour change promises not only to improve clinical outcomes, but to address the rising demand for health services. Better education and awareness can help individuals to make smarter choices. There are a range of interventions available, but the challenge is providing the right patient with the right behaviour change intervention at the right time. If We Can Predict, We Can Prevent Now we have new tools at our disposal, informed by research from psychology and behavioural economics, and powered by technological advances. As someone with a keen interest in behaviour change and the predictive power of analytics, I believe machine learning can help to make our health systems more sustainable. Artificial Intelligence (AI) allows us to evaluate how an individual makes lifestyle decisions and tailor behaviour change programmes to suit their needs. When considering an example of poor medication adherence, if we are aware of who is at risk and...
Nadim Yared is President and Chief Executive Officer of CVRx and Chairman of the AdvaMed’s Board of Directors, our sister organisation in the United States. He is a speaker at the MedTech Forum 2018 and his sessions include: CEO #NOFILTER and The MedTech Europe Code as a Business Enabler, both on Thursday 25th of January. For more information go to the MTF website and follow #MTF2018 on Twitter. *************************************** The toss of a dice. An incoming tornado. The decline of investment in medtech. Each of these events could be considered a butterfly effect – the notion that small causes can have broad effects. The medical device industry is undergoing tremendous tectonic shifts, where advances in technology are crossing new boundaries in the medical device space and widening horizons for patients. Internally, our industry has been evolving in response to these advancements. R&D teams have become more digital, more connected, more in-tune with the trends of Silicon Valley. Internet companies are empowering patients with information that enables them to control their destiny more than ever before. Patient advocacy groups are getting stronger and more influential. With this in mind, you might assume that our industry is growing healthy and that our innovation ecosystem is vibrant. Well, maybe. The number of U.S. patents in our field is at an all-time high. However, the translation of that innovation into products that are actually accessible to patients is bottlenecked. And the canaries in the mine here are the small medtech companies. I have seen the number of new medical device companies being formed fall over the past decade. In fact, ten years ago there were four times as many new companies as there were last year. While the total funds allocated by venture firms have been reduced by half, the average investment required by...