thrombosis

Many of us know someone affected by stroke. It is the second leading cause of death globally and results in 50% of survivors being chronically disabled. [1] In Europe, the incident of stroke will have increased by 34% by the middle of the next decade. [2] The impact of stroke The impact on individuals and families can be profound. Stroke also has serious economic and social consequences. In the EU in 2015, the direct healthcare costs of stroke were €20 billion, with nearly three-quarters of these costs relating to in-hospital care. [3] The total cost of stroke in the EU has been estimated at €45 billion. [2] Ischaemic stroke is particularly concerning because of its sudden onset and devastating consequences. It accounts for 85% of all strokes and is caused by a blockage cutting off blood supply to the brain or a damaged artery in the brain. [4] Ischaemic stroke is as fast as it is destructive. With stroke cases, time is brain . Seconds can be the difference between a full, independent life or a life of dependency. The quicker someone is seen and treated by a specialist stroke team, the better their recovery. Removing clots A blood clot that blocks or slows blood flow to the brain can lead to stroke. Mechanical thrombectomy (MT)– a minimally invasive procedure – can be used to remove clots from the brain. The procedure requires skilled surgeons and innovative tools to retrieve the clot which caused the stroke. From a patient’s perspective, the outcomes are best if the clot is removed at the first pass as repeated attempts risk complications. The ARISE II study found that faster and complete resolution of ischemic stroke through manual clot removal is associated with improved outcomes; two thirds of patients in this particular study were functionally...