high-tech

2015 has been predicted, by many commentators, as the year that digital health will officially ‘’take off’’ due to increased consumer-wide acceptance, a growing array of digitally enabled health applications and increased investment levels. All of these factors are contributing to the cause for more and more leading consumer brands to enter into the digital health space, as product innovation and business growth opportunities present themselves accordingly. The FT Digital Health SummitEurope is bringing together leaders from all parts of the healthcare industry to assess the uptake and advancement of healthcare's digital transformation. With executive leaders from Janssen, Sanofi, Boehringer Ingelheim, GSK and Bayer all speaking at the event you will gain insight into how these pharma companies are prioritising their digital strategies. You will also be able to assess how digital innovations can be incorporated into the everyday doctor-patient relationship through a unique panel discussion exclusively involving Chief Medical Officers . Investment in this sector is of course critical for its success so a diverse panel involving speakers from investment banking, private equity and venture capital will discuss the opportunities as well as the risks in financing digital health. Alongside this, speakers from the likes of Genomics England, the NHS and the European Commission will analyse the regulatory challenges that along with investment formats, form the basis of success in digital health business models and consumer acceptance. What can be done then? Building on the Financial Times’ expertise and coverage of health, life science and digital business, the FT Digital Health Summit Europe will bring together stakeholders from across the healthcare ecosystem – payers, providers, technology, data and life science companies as well as financiers, to bring unique focus and insight into the commercial, economical and regulatory challenges that healthcare’s digital transformation faces when it looks to finally ‘’take...
A 3D Printed Breakthrough for Complex Children’s Fractures from Materialise NV on Vimeo . Imagine that you break your arm and it heals back together incorrectly, making it difficult to perform simple, everyday tasks. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if your surgeon could use medical imaging data from your arm, make a 3D virtual model and test multiple approaches to figure out the best way to fix it? With 3D visualization software, this is possible. What about going one step further and your surgeon making surgical guides so he/she would know exactly where to cut and drill your bone, and use implants and plates designed to fit your unique anatomy? 3D Printing can make this happen. 3D Printing software and services have drastically grown over the past few years in the medical sector, particularly when it comes to surgical planning software and patient-specific medical devices. Patient-specific guides by Materialise More patients have benefited from 3D Printing software and solutions as more medical centers have adopted this technology. However, with this advancement comes the flipside, which is that regulatory bodies face the challenge to make this technology available while maintaining patient safety standards. This is why we advocate for dedicated regulation when it comes to medical devices so that it can continue to grow consistently and safely in the years to come. Regulatory Obstacles along the Road… This lack of regulation for 3D-printed, patient-specific medical devices can be seen in the current version of the EU’s regulatory framework. The EU has been working for many years on an update to the Medical Devices Directive. This proposed legislation has many noble attributes in addition to overcoming the flaws and gaps of the existing Medical Devices Directive, such as supporting technology and science innovation while simultaneously strengthening patient safety. This is something that we...
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